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shaqueeralopezz:

brittana4ever4:

There can never be too many gifs of the kiss

still not over it

(via leigh-kelly)

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womenwhokickass:

Brittney Griner: Why she kicks ass
She is a 23 year old,  6 feet 8 inches tall, professional basketball player who currently plays for the Phoenix Mercury of the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA).
"There are a whole lot of ways to be a woman."
She was the first NCAA basketball player ever to score 2,000 points and block 500 shots, and has won two Naismith trophies.
In 2012 she was named the AP Player of the Year and the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four, and was granted the Best Female Athlete ESPY Award.
In 2009, Griner was named the nation’s #1 high school women’s basketball player by Rivals.com, featured on the cover of ESPN’s Rise Magazine, was selected by the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association as the 2009 State Farm/WBCA High School Player of the Year.
She was the the first person to dunk twice in a single WNBA, on her debut game.
She has a Nike contract that will allow her the freedom to  wear menswear apparel (something that has never been done before.)
“I knew once I went pro that I wanted to come out because I wanted to work with LGBT youth — to let them know it’s OK. To younger girls and boys I would say, ‘It’s never too late — you can come out at your own time’, but it’s definitely rewarding knowing you can be who you are and have a good support group around you. It makes your life 100 times better.”

womenwhokickass:

Brittney Griner: Why she kicks ass

  • She is a 23 year old,  6 feet 8 inches tall, professional basketball player who currently plays for the Phoenix Mercury of the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA).
  • "There are a whole lot of ways to be a woman."
  • She was the first NCAA basketball player ever to score 2,000 points and block 500 shots, and has won two Naismith trophies.
  • In 2012 she was named the AP Player of the Year and the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four, and was granted the Best Female Athlete ESPY Award.
  • In 2009, Griner was named the nation’s #1 high school women’s basketball player by Rivals.com, featured on the cover of ESPN’s Rise Magazine, was selected by the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association as the 2009 State Farm/WBCA High School Player of the Year.
  • She was the the first person to dunk twice in a single WNBA, on her debut game.
  • She has a Nike contract that will allow her the freedom to  wear menswear apparel (something that has never been done before.)
  • “I knew once I went pro that I wanted to come out because I wanted to work with LGBT youth — to let them know it’s OK. To younger girls and boys I would say, ‘It’s never too late — you can come out at your own time’, but it’s definitely rewarding knowing you can be who you are and have a good support group around you. It makes your life 100 times better.”
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Professional women’s hoops

Brings a tear to my eye still. When I was playing it would never have occurred to me that women could ever get paid to play basketball. It’s too slow, but things are changing.

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coplogic

(Son was approached by a kid in the park who seemed nice, asked if he could borrow son’s phone, then ran off with it. I made an online police report. Our PD uses an online service called “coplogic” for these reports. ‘Cell Phone’ is not an option, but ‘Keypunch Machine’ is.)

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brittanacon2014:

All author questions have been sent out as of today!

Most were sent to your fanfic PM (some via email) so PLEASE GO CHECK YOUR INBOX! There is no character limit, we simply ask that you stay on topic as much as possible. Fanfic had trouble with the email address for your response submissions so…

(via jennamacaroni)

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College A/U 15

gethigherff:

All hail MCM for her super quick, awesome beta skills on this one.

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beyondcanon:

Character(s): Santana L. & Brittany P.

Summary: Film noir!Brittana. Santana is a cynical private investigator and Brittany is a femme fatale trophy wife and her lastest client.

(previous)

iv.

The city could tell you her secrets, if you knew how to ask.

I went…

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Unicorn Turds (Part 8)

jennamacaroni:

two parts in one day, holy smokes!  i’m telling you, SO MANY HP feels i am not equipped.  also i didn’t edit this one much, sorry ‘bout it.

you can find all the other parts here.

thanks for spending part of your day in my head.

character(s): Santana L. & Brittany P.

summary: Santana Lopez has been crushing on Brittany Pierce since she was a first year.  But Brittany is the most popular girl in school and a star quidditch player, and Santana is practically invisible…  Harry Potter AU Brittana.

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nodus tollens

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the realization that the plot of your life doesn’t make sense to you anymore—that although you thought you were following the arc of the story, you keep finding yourself immersed in passages you don’t understand, that don’t even seem to belong in the same genre—which requires you to go back and reread the chapters you had originally skimmed to get to the good parts, only to learn that all along you were supposed to choose your own adventure.

(via oh-thats-wanky)

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brittanacon2014:

***Just 2.5 weeks until BrittanaCon!!! There’s still time to get a SUPPORTING MEMBERSHIP or make a DONATION, they’ll remain open until August 7th***

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The tenth installment of our Featured Author Series showcases a Con staff member who has been working her…

Quote
"I almost thanked you for
teaching me something about survival
back there,
but then I remembered
that the ocean never
handed me the gift of swimming.
I gave it to myself."

— Y.Z, what I forgot to remember (via rustyvoices)

(via thelittleidiotthatcould)

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Confidential to

@sarahcustard
I have not forgotten about your prompt! One day inspiration will hit me! I promise! xo, mcm

Tags: sarahcustard
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wind-singer said: Once you get this you have to say 5 nice things about yourself publicly and then send it to 10 of your favourite followers. Thinking good thoughts about yourself is hard but it will make you feel better so give it a go, for the sake of spreading positivity. :) (time to go again, MCM. I want folks to get practice at this. :)

1) I have the best friends.
2) I appreciate how incredibly fortunate I am.
3) I strive to be supportive to my friends (and folks I don’t know all that well).
4) Sometimes I write stuff I’m really proud of.
5) I try to let go of grief and anger at those who have hurt me (with varying degrees of success).

hugs, y’all! {}{}{}

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oh-thats-wanky:

rugsagenda:

Good writers write between the words, between sentences and paragraphs. The single word may not carry the entire meaning, but its absence would make the text different. This is a way to express something beyond the exact words. It draws the reader in, it creates a response. Another way is to use metaphor to make language more visual. And this is not just for literary purposes.

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This is a continuation of this discussion.

Rugs asked, “How do you respond to feelings being described using technical and more or less literal language?”

My answer is: I don’t. Let’s take a look at a technical description of anger:

anger, n.

1. That which pains or afflicts, or the passive feeling which it produces; trouble, affliction, vexation, sorrow.

2. The active feeling provoked against the agent; passion, rage; wrath, ire, hot displeasure.

—Oxford English Dictionary

Reading that definition leaves me cold, which is also how I feel when I come across writing like “Santana was angry. It made Brittany sad.” It’s worth noting that even the OED resorts to using a metaphor (“hot displeasure”) in its defintion.

Technical writing is inert. It’s writing from a distance. It’s the “tell” part of “show, don’t tell.” But it does serve a purpose, and that is to establish a cultural baseline, an agreement of terms, because we all experience things differently. It’s a starting point. “Santana was angry,” has meaning, but it feels flat in a storytelling sense because it’s not enough.

For me, writing is about connection. It’s me saying, “Here’s a story I think you can relate to,” and then giving you enough detail so that you don’t have a choice but to feel something.

But how do you make someone relate to anger when they don’t understand it in a conventional sense? I have no answer for that.

Absolutely, technical language puts me off, pulls me out, distances me, and makes it very difficult to empathize. Talking with my son is like this. I attempt to tell him a feeling I am feeling and he bombards me with basketball statistics or iPhone minutiae. Talking with him can be a bit like talking with the alien commander in Galaxy Quest… Perhaps I’m connecting with him, perhaps not. Sometimes I won’t be able to tell until much, much later if he asks me something about it.

I imagine describing the sensations in the body associated with specific emotions could possibly work to communicate feelings, or maybe describing the chemical reactions going on inside. Once my son asked me if I was crying, and I said yes. He asked why and I told him that in women my age sometimes our bodies make chemicals that give us the sensation of being sad, for no external reason. That seemed to mean something to him, so I left it there…

(Source: heartsandmagic)

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rugsagenda:

On language and feeling
This is a continuation of this and this. Thanks for participating in the fun!
Lately I have pondered the relationship between feelings and language, and I’m still turning it around in my head, looking for new viewpoints and conclusions. These are just a few thoughts. 
I meet clients in my work who find other people confusing because they do not use language in a logical way, or rather they use language to express things that are confusing and illogical to my clients. This issue has largely to do with differences in cognitive processing, but the question sparked something in me.
Language is a tool for social interaction, for self-expression, for reasoning and drawing conclusions, for telling stories, for teaching and learning, and for thinking. It is also an art form. Or several art forms.Feelings are not language. Experiences are not language. Language can be used for a cognitive representation of feelings, but the cognitive and the emotional, while intermingling, are not the same. When feelings are translated into words and expressed, they are restricted, confined, adapted. The words themselves are rarely enough.
There often need to be eye contact, intakes of breath and exhales, hand gestures, posture, facial expressions, tones of voice, emphasis, repetition, silences,  directions of gaze other than towards the eyes. 
Contextual clues need to be taken into consideration. Time, place, type of relationship, common history, shared knowledge, physical proximity, and purpose of the specific conversation and/or utterance. (In-person conversations in this example.)
And even then, the expression of feelings is limited in the sense that language cannot really fully describe a feeling. This is not bad. It’s just how it is. (Or is it?) This is no reason to not express feelings. Expression can enrich the experience of the feeling, both because the expression itself does something to the emotional process, and because sharing one’s heart can evoke an empathetic response in the other person that creates a sense of togetherness. 
But because feelings are not language, feelings expressed with words cannot be expected to be exact representations. So much of our human experience cannot be put into exact words. I personally don’t believe this makes language in any way faulty. But I know not everyone would agree. 
Good writers write between the words, between sentences and paragraphs. The single word may not carry the entire meaning, but its absence would make the text different. This is a way to express something beyond the exact words. It draws the reader in, it creates a response. Another way is to use metaphor to make language more visual. And this is not just for literary purposes.
When you look closer, you notice that metaphors are so pervasive in the English language (and in many other languages) that it is hard to imagine the language without them. (Are you feeling up today? Down? Low? High?) They aid our thinking on abstract matters. The internal logic of concrete source domains allows us to elaborate our abstract target domains, making them as visually complex as our emotional (or intellectual) experiences are inside of us. If it weren’t for language, we wouldn’t need metaphor!
I meet people who are frustrated because they are expected to describe and express feelings that they do not always understand in the way other people seem to. They also don’t necessarily see the point of sharing an experience. Sometimes they have a hard time with metaphors too, which makes the whole thing even trickier.
This is why I’m thinking about this, because it keeps coming back in discussions. How would you describe feelings without the use of metaphors or visual imagery? And this little experiment also raises the question: how do you respond to feelings being described using technical and more or less literal language? Do you react differently? Do you feel safer and less confused? Or do you feel that you are not drawn into an empathetic response, but kept at a distance? Any other reaction? 

140718pulsing colorsinfuse mewithserenity

rugsagenda:

On language and feeling

This is a continuation of this and this. Thanks for participating in the fun!

Lately I have pondered the relationship between feelings and language, and I’m still turning it around in my head, looking for new viewpoints and conclusions. These are just a few thoughts.

I meet clients in my work who find other people confusing because they do not use language in a logical way, or rather they use language to express things that are confusing and illogical to my clients. This issue has largely to do with differences in cognitive processing, but the question sparked something in me.

Language is a tool for social interaction, for self-expression, for reasoning and drawing conclusions, for telling stories, for teaching and learning, and for thinking. It is also an art form. Or several art forms.
Feelings are not language. Experiences are not language. Language can be used for a cognitive representation of feelings, but the cognitive and the emotional, while intermingling, are not the same. When feelings are translated into words and expressed, they are restricted, confined, adapted. The words themselves are rarely enough.

There often need to be eye contact, intakes of breath and exhales, hand gestures, posture, facial expressions, tones of voice, emphasis, repetition, silences,  directions of gaze other than towards the eyes.

Contextual clues need to be taken into consideration. Time, place, type of relationship, common history, shared knowledge, physical proximity, and purpose of the specific conversation and/or utterance. (In-person conversations in this example.)

And even then, the expression of feelings is limited in the sense that language cannot really fully describe a feeling. This is not bad. It’s just how it is. (Or is it?) This is no reason to not express feelings. Expression can enrich the experience of the feeling, both because the expression itself does something to the emotional process, and because sharing one’s heart can evoke an empathetic response in the other person that creates a sense of togetherness.

But because feelings are not language, feelings expressed with words cannot be expected to be exact representations. So much of our human experience cannot be put into exact words. I personally don’t believe this makes language in any way faulty. But I know not everyone would agree.

Good writers write between the words, between sentences and paragraphs. The single word may not carry the entire meaning, but its absence would make the text different. This is a way to express something beyond the exact words. It draws the reader in, it creates a response. Another way is to use metaphor to make language more visual. And this is not just for literary purposes.

When you look closer, you notice that metaphors are so pervasive in the English language (and in many other languages) that it is hard to imagine the language without them. (Are you feeling up today? Down? Low? High?) They aid our thinking on abstract matters. The internal logic of concrete source domains allows us to elaborate our abstract target domains, making them as visually complex as our emotional (or intellectual) experiences are inside of us. If it weren’t for language, we wouldn’t need metaphor!

I meet people who are frustrated because they are expected to describe and express feelings that they do not always understand in the way other people seem to. They also don’t necessarily see the point of sharing an experience. Sometimes they have a hard time with metaphors too, which makes the whole thing even trickier.

This is why I’m thinking about this, because it keeps coming back in discussions. How would you describe feelings without the use of metaphors or visual imagery? And this little experiment also raises the question: how do you respond to feelings being described using technical and more or less literal language? Do you react differently? Do you feel safer and less confused? Or do you feel that you are not drawn into an empathetic response, but kept at a distance? Any other reaction?

140718

pulsing colors
infuse me
with
serenity

(Source: heartsandmagic)